I’ve Got DOMS and I’m Feeling Good

23 08 2014

 

I love waking up in the morning and feeling the rewards of my labor. In this case, I’m feeling soreness in my legs from a run I did in the pouring rain two days ago. I felt the soreness in my legs while walking down the stairs to retrieve my newspaper; I felt it squatting down to pick up the newspaper; and I felt it walking back up the stairs with my newspaper.  And although it sounds like I’m whining, I’m actually loving every moment of it. I know that I have overloaded my muscles (topic for next blog) and thus my legs will become stronger and I have DOMS to thank for it.

Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) is a condition where soreness in the muscles is felt twenty-four to forty-eight hours post exercise and can last up to seven days. This is a neurological response to notify the body that the muscles have been stressed to their limit and any further stress could lead to serious injury. The American College of Sports Medicine refers to DOMS as the first sign of muscle damage “where the individual has done too much too soon” (Bushman, p.366). However, soreness and muscle fatigue are common and are precursors for the muscle adaptation response, therefore, casting a grey area when referring to DOMS as an indicator of the muscles getting just enough or too much workload.

Many of my clients are very timid when it comes to feeling sore after a workout. Many do not like feeling pain after exercising and I can’t blame them. The once popular mentality for building muscle, “no pain, no gain” has long been abandoned. Therefore, as a trainer, I need to progress individuals at a safe rate and allow their muscles to adapt at the right pace. For those who are trying to gain muscular advantages, whether it be strength, power, or endurance, I must heed the warning signs of overtraining. Delayed onset muscle soreness can be a good way to track your workout intensities. Rate your post soreness on a zero to six Likert-type scale, where 1 = minor soreness, 3 = moderate soreness, 5 = extreme soreness. You should try to stay below a rating of three. This will allow you to elicit the adaptation response and promote physiological gains without overly damaging your muscles, leading to injury and setback.

Even with minor soreness from DOMS, the body has encountered micro-trauma within the muscle. It’s important to allow those muscles to repair and rebuild before tackling another intense bout of exercise using those same muscles. Ample rest time is recommended and hydration with proper nutrition is beneficial in healing the damaged tissue. Static stretching does not aid in the repair or reduction of DOMS, but should be done after exercise to return the muscle to it’s lengthened state. Deep tissue massage is controversial for relieving DOMS, as they may cause more pain within the musculature and extend the length of time needed to heal. Be aware of your intensity and remember, if you can’t walk the next day, you’ve probably gone to far.

References:
Bushman, B. (2014) ACSM’S Resource for the Personal Trainer (4th Ed.) Philadelphia , PA: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

McGrath, R., Whitehead, J., & Caine, D. (2014) The Effects of Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation Stretching on Post-Exercise Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness in Young Adults. International Journal of Exercise Science. Retrieved on August 23, 2014 from http://digitalcommons.wku.edu/ijes/vol7/iss1/3/

Herbert, RD., de Noronha, M., Kamper, SJ. (2011) Stretching before or after exercise does not reduce delayed-onset muscle soreness. British Journal of Sports Medicine. Retreieve on August 23, 2014 from http://bjsm.bmj.com/content/45/15/1249.short

Jernigan, K. (2013) Problems of Deep Tissue Massage. Retrieved on August 23, 2014 from http://www.livestrong.com/article/92924-problems-deep-tissue-massage/





Aracknophobia

16 08 2014

You may know people with this fear. If you’ve been to a gym where you can’t find the matching pair of dumbbells or you don’t know if someone’s still using the bench, that person probably is aracknophobic. Not to be confused with arachnophobia (spelled with a “k” and not an “h”),  which is the fear of spiders or other arachnids. Aracknophobia* (a.k.a, Iracknophobia) is the fear of re-racking your weights after you use them.

I heard this word used by my coworker, Phil, and immediately thought, “by George, he’s got it!” These people aren’t too weak to put away their weights, since they were able to use them. And when I think about laziness, these people are able to get up off their butts and motivate themselves to exercise so intensely that this couldn’t be the cause. But what if these people can lift the weight but just are too scared to put them back? They might fear that the weight might slip out of their hands because their last set was so intense that they have no more energy to lift that weight.

Luckily there is a cure for this phobia and it’s a technique that psychologist and psychiatrists use with their patients when a real phobia is present. They actually have the person expose themselves to the phobia in a controlled setting. So an arachnophobic person may hold a spider in their hand to witness that it will not hurt them, thereby creating a peaceful image in their minds when thinking about spiders in the future. The same should be done for those suffering from aracknophobia. The next time you see someone with this condition, walk up to them sympathetically (gently patting them on the shoulder as if to console a crying child if needed) and let them know that you will help them out. Hand them the weights that they were using and walk them to the proper rack to replace the weights. Then encourage them that no harm has come to them and that they can start re-racking the weights themselves. Together, let’s make our workout areas a safe and stress-free environment, so that our workout time can be spent exercising and not wasted on finding dumbbells.

*Disclaimer: In case some of you are thinking that there really is a phobia of re-racking weights, please note that there is not.





Mise-en-place

12 08 2014

You never know what you’ll find on NPR when you drive to work in the morning. Today’s segment in Morning Edition was perfect for relating to my own work as well as to my clients goals. (Hear the story by clicking here.) The title of the segment is “For A More Ordered Life, Organize Like A Chef.” It discussed a concept that many chefs adopt known as “mise-en-place” which is French for “put in place.” This is a phrase that they use to keep themselves organized  and focused on the task at hand.

During my work, I’m not only training my clients, but also keeping the members happy, ensuring that the facility is safe and in good working order, communicating with my team, and trouble shooting any problems that may arise. If I’m not adopting the mise-en-place concept, my client will not receive a hundred percent of my focus and will lose out on their paid time with me, which could also prevent them from achieving their workout goals. Therefore, keeping my work organized will allow me to stay focused on the task at hand and not get tied up in too many things at once which would result in a loss in productivity. Another great principle of mise-en-place is “slow down to speed up”. Chef and Owner of Telepan, Bill Telepan, describes this principle: “I always say, ‘Look, I’d rather you take an extra minute or two and slow up service to get it right.’ Because the one minute behind you are now is going to become six minutes behind because we’re going to have to redo the plate.”

An excellent example of how this second principle relates to your fitness goal is to think of a time when you wanted to rush through everything to see results. You go through your workouts quickly expecting to see something all of a sudden or you search to find that easy “pill” that will get you to your goals quicker, only to find yourself back where you were two to three months later. If you take your time to slow down and focus on doing it right the first time, you will reap the rewards of your work when you’re finished. You will also realize that your results stay with you a lot longer and you won’t have to start all over again. In addition to the principle of slowing down to speed up is the prevention of injury if you do things right the first time. Who wants to be laden with an injury, only to find out that you can’t continue exercising towards your goals for another three to six months?

Follow this discipline and you’ll be successful in your fitness goals and in your life. Some chefs go as far as tattooing “mise-en-place” on their body, but I don’t believe you need to go that far. Maybe you can write it in your daily log as a reminder to stay focused on the task at hand. You are keeping a daily log, aren’t you?

Reference:
http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/2014/08/11/338850091/for-a-more-ordered-life-organize-like-a-chef





Catch of the Day

10 08 2014

Fish is a great way to receive  your dietary needs of healthy fats. In addition to Omega-3’s, fish is a great source of protein. Here is an easy recipe I found in “Simple Suppers” by Gina Steer. This was easy to make and it tasted great. One recommendation is to reheat any leftovers in the oven rather than microwave to prevent softening of the pastry border.

Fish Puff Tart – (Cook time: 35 minutes) Fish Puff Tart

Ingredients:
3/4 lb. prepared puff pastry, thawed if frozen
5 oz. fresh cod
5 oz. smoked haddock
1tbsp. pesto sauce
2 tomatoes, sliced
4 oz. goat cheese, sliced
1 large egg, beaten
freshly chopped parsley, to garnish

Prepare:
 1. Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F. On a lightly floured surface, roll out the pastry into an 8 x 10 in. rectangle.
2. Draw a 7 x 9 in. rectangle in the center of the pastry to form a 1 in. border. (Be careful not to cut through the pastry)
3. Lightly cut crisscross patterns in the border of the pastry with a knife.
4. Place the fish on a chopping board, and with a sharp knife, skin the cod and smoked haddock. Cut into thin slices.
5. Spread the pesto evenly over the bottom of the pastry shell with the back of a spoon.
6. Arrange the fish, tomatoes, and cheese in the pastry shell, and brush the pastry with the beaten egg.
7. Bake the tart in the preheated oven for 20-25 min. until the pastry is well risen, puffed, and golden brown. Garnish with the chopped parsley and serve immediately.

 

Reference:
Steer, G. (2011). Simple Suppers. essential recipes; Flame Tree Publishing. p. 48





Staying Current

10 08 2014

While watering my plants on my patio, I noticed a lot of grit and spiderwebs had accumulated on an old duffle bag that contains a pair of speed skates. Obviously I have not used these skates in a while, and when pausing to remember when the last time I had used them, I realized that it has been over 3 years since I have laced them up. I think a part of me still thinks I’m going to join the Olympics and race like Apollo Ono, hence still holding onto this indispensable item. My wife believes I’m a pack rat and will hold onto any sporting equipment that I acquired since birth which holds some truth when I pull out a ribbon from my junior olympic track and field years. The reality is that I probably will never use them because I will not need to train in that manner anymore. If I want to inline skate, I can use my normal pair of recreational skates that I own and be just fine.

Many of my clients and even those I speak with who ask for fitness advice also believe that they should be exercising the same way that they did ten to twenty years ago. As our life plans change, so should everything else  when it comes to our fitness goals. Think about how much time you have now to commit to your workouts. Can you make the time commitment that you had a year ago? Think about your physical condition. Do you still have the same physically health as you were a year ago? Is your motivation to reach your goal still burning brightly? These are some questions that can change the way you tackle your plan of action. You might have to change the exercises you do because of a current limiting health condition. You may have to think about revising your goal to meet your time challenges.

Those who think they can exercise like they did in the past may be faced with a rude awakening. Exercise with purpose, but train within the current confines of your body. Every day we change a little and we need to notice these changes if we want to succeed in our goals. I have realized that I will never be a speed skate so today, those skates are going to Goodwill.





5 Ways to Train Smarter with Your Smart Phone

26 05 2014

Looking at the past week, I must give credit to my phone for helping me stay on track with my workouts. There have also been other motivators like my wife and friends who have kept me on track. However, when the busy work week comes upon you, the excuse “I have no time to exercise” can be very real. With the help of my smart phone, I was able to keep my workouts and nutrition on track. Since it was able to help me, I wanted to share with you the 5 ways of how just keeping your phone nearby can keep you on track.

1. Use Your Calendar
This app can be very helpful to make sure that you find that time in your busy work life. We all have appointments, so why not make one for your workouts. I also set an alarm for my workouts to remind me that this is as important as my client’s training session.

Keep your own workout appointments!

Keep your own workout appointments!

2. Bring Along The Tunes
The fact that your phone is also your Walkman (anyone even know what those are anymore?) is enough reason to get pumped up and get moving. Everyone should have a go-to playlist or station that gets them revved up for a good walk, run, or lift. Streaming music sites like Pandora, iTunes Music, and Beats Music, allows listeners to choose a genre of music and the station will choose music that falls within that genre. This gives you an endless supply of tunes to keep you going strong. Check out my go-to Playlist below. Plug those earbuds in and start training.

Doug’s Go-To Playlist

  1. “Good Feeling” -Flo Rida
  2. “Timber” -Pitbull (ft. Ke$sha)
  3. “Sweat” -David Guetta & Snoop Dogg
  4. “Numb” -Linkin Park
  5. “Remember The Name” -Fort Minor
  6. “Not Afraid” -Eminem
  7. “I’m a Machine” -David Guetta (ft. Crystal Nicole & Tyrese Gibson
  8. “My Songs Know What You Did In the Dark (Light Em Up)” -Fall Out Boy
  9. “Anxiety” -Black Eyed Peas

3. Track Your Progress
There are a myriad of nutrition apps nowadays out there for free or a small cost. These apps are great because they tell you if you’re getting the correct nutrients to meet your goals. The one that I have found to be useful is “Lose It” by FitNow Co. This app is easy to use and sets calorie recommendations based on your weight goal. I’m not trying to lose weight, the opposite in fact, and this app still keeps me inline with this goal. It allows for me to add in my exercise to calculate if I’m eating enough to see an increase in weight or under and thus my weight will continue to drop. The nice feature of this app is the barcode scanning function which allows you to take the product and scan it to get all the nutritional facts, rather than searching for the food.

Lose It App IMG_0815

4. Take A Video
This is not the time to take a selfie. Taking a look at your form is a good idea when you don’t have a friend or mirror close by. Placing your phone on a bench while you perform squats or a chest press allows you to see what you’re doing right or provides valuable feedback so you don’t wake up the next day with a strained muscle. Even placing it behind you while you’re on the treadmill can show if you’re walking or running gait is off. Professional athletes use video analysis all the time to keep their technique in check and progressing forward. Flip your camera on and use it to improve your results and not your status “likes.”

5. Post It
Telling your friends about your workouts on social media sites is a great way to stay motivated and accountable for your actions. My friend and I have agreed to keep each other motivated by sending each other weekly reminders of our goals. By sending him my progress through text messages and social media sites like FaceBook, I have another way of keeping true to my workouts. Post your goal on your status bar or text it to a friend. Then get them to keep you accountable by asking them to check in with you on a weekly basis. My clients will send me pics of them working out when they’re away to show me that they’ve held up their end of the deal. It’s an easy way to grow your support group and highlight the progress you’ve made.





Dazed and Confused

18 05 2014

I stopped receiving the morning paper last week which made me believe that someone had been swiping my paper before I got to it. My wife pointed out that we live on the second floor, in the corner unit of our condo complex, and the neighbors across from us are not the newspaper type. She also noted that there was no one living next door to us and that the next neighbor was at the other end of the unit. So in order for someone to steal our paper, they’d have to make the effort to tip toe upstairs, make the grab, rush back downstairs and into their unit at 6:30am which would be too much energy for our 65+ neighbors downstairs. In addition, we were sure that they had better things to do than plan an early morning heist. So I checked our account and it turned out my credit card on file had expired and I failed to update the info, resulting in a suspension on my subscription. Makes sense.

I’m glad to know that no one was catching up on yesterday’s news at my expense. I updated my card on file and was happy to see a fresh paper outside my door the next day. Fast forward one day later and I was still glad to find a Sunday paper outside my door. I pulled it out of the plastic bag and was surprised to see the front page main article (only exercise professionals and health nuts would get a kick out of articles like these).

From the Sarasota Herald Tribune

From the Sarasota Herald Tribune

The line that bewildered me was the end of the second sentence in the title (third if you count “Overmedicated?”), “Doctors would like to change that, but where to begin?” Really folks? We’re still confused about the direction we need to take to stay healthy and drug free? Maybe some of these docs are also tapping the drug supply. The article goes on by stating that of the 10 medications that the average 75 years old American is prescribed, a 100 percent chance of an adverse reaction from one of the drugs will be encountered. The average number of adverse effects is four. The result of these reactions only leads to decrease quality of life.

However, we know that daily physical activity has been shown to reduce comorbidity risk factors leading to a reduction in medication use. Regular exercise and gentle stretching exercises such as yoga have been evident in relieving chronic pain in patients. Even the article highlights ways to reduce pain without medication (see picture to right, click picture to enlarge).

From Sarasota Herald Tribune What is similar in all of these remedies?

From Sarasota Herald Tribune
What is similar in all of these remedies?

The article states that 40 percent of adults 65 and older take NSAIDs and 10 percent of them are prescribed an opioid for pain relief. So don’t you think that the first place to start is by letting these patients know that regular moderate exercise 30 minutes a day, 5 days a week, infused with gentle stretching for 10 minutes a day, 2-3 days a week can improve many of their conditions. Throw in the statement that the only side effects of physical activity when done properly as prescribed are positive effects such as, improved range of motion, reduced chronic pain, enhanced daily function, and improved quality of life. Let’s also inform patients about this alternative form way before we’re signing the prescription pad for medication number 10. It’s apparent and we must face the truth; exercise is medicine!

References:
Smith, B. (2014, May 18). Overmedicated? Herald Tribune. p. A1, A5
Landmark, T, et al. (2011). Associations between recreational exercise and chronic pain in the general population: Evidence from the HUNT 3 study. Journal of the International Association for the study of Pain. Retrieved on May 18, 2014 from http://www.painjournalonline.com/article/S0304-3959(11)00290-9/abstract








Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 50 other followers